Advocates deal with issues across the board. These issues include human rights, health, access to care, housing and financial abuse.

Every case is reviewed three months after closure, and people are informed that they can re-contact us if necessary.

Case 1: Advocacy support for an 89 year old lady with dementia…

Social Services had alleged that an 89 year-old woman with dementia was being beaten by her daughter (her main care giver) which led to AIB being contacted. The daughter told AIB that bruising had occurred whilst helping her mother in and out of the bath. Although the consultant had confirmed by letter to Social Services that the Mother’s medical condition caused bruising to Social Services, this had not been received by them. The mother’s wish to return to Ghana, supported by her family were rejected and instead Social Services sent the Mother to a residential home. The advocate persisted in contacting the Head of Social Care, Occupational Therapists, family and friends, resulting in previously lost hospital correspondence being found. Despite an apology by Social Services for the accusation of abuse, the Mother was refused clearance to go to Ghana, now on medical grounds. Advocacy challenged the social workers’ decision for her to remain in residential care (which she hated) and demonstrated that treatment required would be provided adequately. Eight months after the first meeting, the mother returned to Ghana, where she is much better.

Case 2: A husband and wife’s struggle to stay together…

Denied by the discharge co-ordinator to re-join her husband of 60 years at the care home in which she resided on the grounds of changing care needs, the advocate liaised with Social Services, hospital and the care home to ensure she moved back as wished. Mrs B’s daughter felt her mother and father wouldn’t have survived long without each other nor achieved the couple being reunited without the advocate’s intervention.

Case 3: Returning home…

83 and terminally ill, all Mr T wanted was to be near his only living relative in Northern Ireland. Challenging the legal obstacles to this on human rights’ grounds, the advocate succeeded in getting both sides to agree and sign the transfer of care contracts. Six months on, Mr T’s health and emotional well-being have significantly improved since his return to his birthplace.

Case 4: Living alone and feeling vulnerable…

Ms J living alone and without relatives was admitted to hospital after a fall. Appearing frightened by her visitors, the advocate wondered whether they were really her friends or taking financial advantage. The advocate established that loans taken out by “friends” in her name and card purchases had cleared over £60,000 from her account. The advocate negotiated for Ms J to be moved to a secure ward as the verbal abuse of the perpetrators visiting her in the hospital was leaving her fearful. At the time of discharge, the advocate helped her move to another place out of the risk area and to then recover some of her money. She is now in a safe and happy environment.